• tastefullyoffensive:

[staycheesy]

That capitalist swine Topham Hatt did this in retaliation for Thomas trying to organize a union. 

    tastefullyoffensive:

    [staycheesy]

    That capitalist swine Topham Hatt did this in retaliation for Thomas trying to organize a union. 

    (via ferrickhistoryts)

  • How many labor laws does it take to reach full communism
    by Anonymous

    marxvx:

    the world may never know

    This is going to be the final exam question next time I teach labor law. 

  • Dear diary

    Once again I am reminded that I really don’t understand people at all. And I think I prefer it that way.

  • I’d sack the world and make a second start, 
    I’d sack my head until I found my heart. 
    I’d fill the distance with a red parade, 
    And burn the banks down while the bugles played.
  • 
Bas Jan Ader (1971) 
from the series Wall Piece with 200 Letters by Mikko Kuorinki
    High-res →

    Bas Jan Ader (1971) 

    from the series Wall Piece with 200 Letters by Mikko Kuorinki

    (Source: growing-orbits, via taysayer)

  • Keywords for the Age of Austerity: Innovation

    jpleary:

    “Keywords for the Age of Austerity” is an occasional series on the  vocabulary of inequality. Certain words, as Raymond Williams wrote in his classic Keywords, bind together ways of seeing culture and society. These shared meanings change over time, shaping and reflecting the society in which they are made. Some of the words I will consider here are old, seemingly innocent terms that have acquired a particular fashion or developed a particular new meaning in recent years; others are recent coinages. All of them relate to to an affinity for hierarchy and a celebration of the virtues of the marketplace, of competition, and of the virtual technologies of our time. This series will explore the historical meanings embedded in these words as well as the new meanings that our age has given them.

    Care to suggest a word? Send me a message or tweet at me.

    Here is the first entry, on the modern virtue of innovation.

    Innovation (n); innovate (v., trans. or intrans.); innovative (adj.).

    The contemporary ubiquity of “Innovation” is an example of how the world of business, despite its claims of rationality and empirical precision, also summons its own enigmatic mythologies.

    image

    Read More

  • Keywords for the Age of Austerity: Stakeholder

    jpleary:

    image

    “Keywords for the Age of Austerity” is an occasional series on the  vocabulary of inequality. Certain words, as Raymond Williams wrote in his classic Keywords, bind together ways of seeing culture and society. These shared meanings change over time, shaping and reflecting the society in which they are made. Some of the words I will consider here are old, seemingly innocent terms that have acquired a particular fashion or developed a particular new meaning in recent years; others are recent coinages. All of them relate to to an affinity for hierarchy and a celebration of the virtues of the marketplace, of competition, and of the virtual technologies of our time. This series will explore the historical meanings embedded in these words as well as the new meanings that our age has given them.

    Care to suggest a word? Send me a message or tweet at me.

    Stakeholder (n.)

    Writing teachers know that one of the laziest writing errors is what we might call the “paleontological fallacy.” Unsure of how to begin, writers will frame an argument in the broadest terms possible, by opening with some timeless generalization: e.g., “in all of human history,” “ever since ancient times,” or “ever since dinosaurs roamed the earth.”

    Here is an example from the management textbook Basics of International Business (2009), which introduces aspiring executives to the concept of “stakeholder theory” (italics added):

    From the earliest of times, safeguarding shareholders’ and/or owners’ interests has been the paramount goal of corporate executives; taking responsibility for the concerns of and interests of stakeholders, on the other hand, is a relatively new concept, probably less than a hundred years old.

    The problem with such paleontological fallacies is not just their imprecision, although “earliest of times” is so grammatically strange a construction as to become almost metaphysical: when can we say that time really begins, anyway? Is there a point, the earliest point, even earlier than that? And were there any stockbrokers then?

    Read More

  • jpleary:

Dr. Evil knows what it means

    jpleary:

    Dr. Evil knows what it means

  • Keywords for the Age of Austerity 2.5: Learning Outcomes

    jpleary:

    A short, digestable, and easily implementable keywords definition for your weekend, because some of these words practically write themselves.

    For more on learning outcomes, let’s take a listen to the Dean of Students at Brigham Young University, who has put together a helpful site to explain…